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Medical Terminology Dictionary

                                  A

  • Abduction: a body part is moved away from the body’s center, such as an arm or a leg.
  • Ablation: a medical procedure that involves destroying a small section of damaged tissue using electrical energy, heat, cold, alcohol, or other modalities.
  • Abrasion: removal of skin or another surface through scraping or rubbing.
  • Abdominoplasty: a procedure to trim the underlying stomach muscles and remove extra skin from the abdomen. Also referred to as a tummy tuck.
  • Abdominal Ultrasound: a process for inspecting the abdominal organs The abdomen’s skin is firmly probed with an ultrasound transducer (probe).
  • Abdominoperineal Resection: an abdominal incision is used during surgery to remove the anus, the rectum, and a portion of the sigmoid colon.
  • Abscopal Effect: describes the reduction in size or disappearance of tumors in areas of the body that wasn’t specifically targeted by local treatments like radiation therapy.
  • Absolute Neutrophil Count: a measure of the blood’s neutrophil content. White blood cells called neutrophils belong to this category. Leukemia, infection, inflammation, and other conditions can all be examined using an absolute neutrophil count.
  • ACE: an angiotensin-converting enzyme that changes the inactive form of the angiotensin protein (angiotensin I) into the active form (angiotensin II).
  • Acute: severe; sharp; begins quickly.
  • Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL): a blood cancer with a rapid progression in which the bone marrow, blood, spleen, liver, and other organs are heavily populated with immature (not fully formed) white blood cells or lymphocytes.
  • Acute Myelogenous Leukemia (AML): a blood cancer that spreads quickly and is characterized by an excess of immature (not fully formed) granulocytes, a type of white blood cell, in the bone marrow and blood.
  • Adenocarcinoma: cancer that starts in glandular cells. Breast, pancreatic, lung, prostate, and colon cancer are among the common adenocarcinomas.
  • Adjuvant Therapy: a form of therapy that is used in addition to standard care. Surgery is frequently used as an adjuvant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • Allogenic Bone Marrow Transplant: a treatment in which a person receives stem cells from a compatible, matched donor.
  • Alopecia: hair loss
  • Alternative Therapy: the implementation of an unproven therapy in place of a conventional (proven) therapy.
  • Angiogram: using a dye, all the blood vessels in an organ, such as the brain, can be seen in order to identify specific tumor types.
  • Anemia: a condition where the red blood cell count is astonishingly low.
  • Anesthesia: loss of feeling or sensation caused by drugs or gases. Loss of consciousness results from general anesthesia. Anesthesia that is local or regional only numbs that specific area.
  • Anesthesiologist: a medical professional who has a specialization in the administration of drugs or other pain-relieving substances, particularly during surgery.
  • Antiemetic: a medicinal stimulant used to treat or prevent vomiting and nausea.
  • Antinausea: a medication that reduces or stops nausea and vomiting also known as an antiemetic. 
  • Apheresis: a procedure where a patient’s own blood is taken, special fluids are extracted from it, and the blood is then given back to the patient.
  • Aplastic Anemia: one type of anemia that develops when the bone marrow fails to produce enough red, white, and platelet blood cells.
  • Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant: a process in which a patient’s own bone marrow is extracted, given radiation or anticancer medication treatment, and then put back into the body.

                                    B

  • Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-  A weakened form bacterium Mycobacterium Bovis. They are used as a solution to stimulate the immune system for the treatment of bladder cancer and also as a vaccine to prevent tuberculosis.
  • Bacillus Calmette-Guérin solution- Used for treating early-stage bladder cancer.
  • Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine- A vaccine that is used to prevent tuberculosis (TB) in patients who are at risk of TB.
  • Baclofen- Is a remedy used for treating certain types of muscle cramps.
  • Bacteria- These are small single-celled organisms and are found everywhere on earth. Some bacteria can cause infections and diseases in both humans and animals.
  • Bacterial toxin- A bacteria can make harmful substances by itself which can cause illness if comes in contact. They can also be made in laboratories. 
  • BAER test– A procedure used to detect the type of hearing loss such as it can be caused by injury or cancer that affects the nerves involved in hearing.
  • Ballon angioplasty– Procedure that is used or applied to open clogged heart arteries.
  • Balversa- a medication that is used to treat adults with urothelial cancer.
  • Barbiturate- A type of medication that causes a decrease in brain activity. It is a type of central nervous system (CNS) depressant.
  • Bariatric surgerySurgery to help weight loss by making changes to the digestive system.
  • Barium (used in X-rays)- To reveal a better image on the x-rays a chunky, white chemical liquid is applied over the organ and other body parts.
  • Barium enema- An x-ray test that aids to highlight any changes or abnormalities in the bowel.
  • Basket trial- Basket trial is a type of clinical trial done on patients who have different types of cancer but have the same mutation or biomarker to see whether the new drug is effective or not.
  • Batimastat- An antimetastatic drug that belongs to a family of drugs called angiogenesis inhibitors. 
  • Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome- A very rare genodermatosis that manifests during infancy or the neonatal period.
  • B cell- Part of the immune system and a type of WBC that makes antibodies.
  • B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia- Is a fast-growing blood cancer in which too many immature blood cells are found in the blood or bone marrow.
  • B-cell lymphoma- Cancer that forms in the B cells can be either fast-growing or slow-growing and mostly are non-Hodgkin lymphomas. 
  • Beta cell tumor of the pancreas- Atypical mass that grows in the B cells of the pancreas which makes insulin. These are usually noncancerous. 
  • Benign- A noncancerous tumor that develops slowly in the body and this growing tumor does not spread to other body parts.
  • Bilateral- Affecting both sides of the body organ.
  • Bilateral nephrectomy- An incision is done to remove both kidneys.
  • Bile- A fluid is released or made by the liver and stored in the gallbladder.
  • Bile duct cancerCancer formed in the bile duct.
  • Biologic response modifiers- A medication that helps target the cause of disease.
  • Biopsy– Taking a small sample of the affected tissue to examine in the laboratory.
  • Bladder- Hollow organ that stores urine in the lower abdomen.
  • Blasts- Undeveloped blood corpuscles (blood cells).
  • Blood- A life-saving body fluid that has four main components: red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, and platelets.
  • Blood banking- A procedure that takes place in the lab to ensure the blood which is donated is kept safe so that it can be used for blood transfusion and other medical procedures.
  • Blood count- A procedure that helps in counting the complete blood count (CBC) i.e. red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets, and hemoglobin, to appraise the overall health and any disorder in the body.
  • Blood poisoning- This happens when unwanted substances like bacteria and toxins spread through and enter the bloodstream.
  • Blood test- A test done by taking a sample of blood to check any abnormalities in the body.
  • B lymphocytes- It is also known as B cells and are a part of the immune system and develop from stem cells in the bone marrow.
  • Blood plasma- A liquid portion of blood that consists of nutrients, minerals, enzymes, and other substances, etc.
  • Bloating- A swelling in the abdomen. The most common cause of bloating is gas as gas builds up in the digestive tract when the undigested foods get broken down.
  • Bone marrow- A soft, spongy tissue that is found in the centermost bone that makes blood cells.
  • Bone marrow transplant (BMT) A procedure that infuses healthy bone marrow from a donor to the recipient.
  • Bone scan or bone scintigraph- A nuclear medicine imaging method of the bone that helps to determine the cause of bizarre bone pain. 
  • Bone survey (skeletal)-  Series of X-rays taken for all the bones in the human body.
  • Bowel- the part of the alimentary canal below the intestines which runs between the stomach and anus is made up of the small bowel (small intestine) and the large bowel (colon and rectum).
  • Bowel preparation- Bowel prep cleans and empties the colon.
  • Brachytherapy-  An internal radiation therapy used to treat cancer. It targets specific tissue around cancer.
  • Breakthrough- Opioid (painkiller) medication that lasts at least 2 to 3 hours.
  • Breakthrough pain- When a narcotic drug (painkiller) does not take effect to relieve the pain.
  • Bronchoscopy- A procedure in which an apparatus that has a small flexible camera tube is used to examine the lungs and air passage.

                                C

  • Calcification: The accumulation of calcium ions, causes soft tissue to harden. Frequently detected by mammography in breast tissue, or by x-ray or cardiac CT scans in coronary arteries.
  • Calbindin: These are described as vitamin-D-dependent calcium-binding proteins in the intestine and kidneys.
  • Calcinosis cutis: A condition where calcium salts are deposited in the subcutaneous tissue and in the skin.
  • Calcitonin: It is a type of hormone that helps in regulating the level of calcium in the body by decreasing it.
  • Calcium: A mineral that is most often associated with healthy teeth and bones and which plays an important role in helping regulate normal heart rhythms and nerve functions.
  • Calcium channel blocker: Medications used for lowering blood pressure. 
  • Callus: Often present on palms and the soles of feet, hardened, thick skin develops from the repetitive rubbing.
  • Cancellous Bone: One of the two forms of tissue that combine to produce bone, this kind is frequently located in the middle of long bones and makes up a significant portion of the hip and spine. Called the trabecular bone as well.
  • CAM – Complementary and Alternative Medicine.
  • Cancer Cancer is a disease where abnormal cells grow without control and spread throughout the body if not treated. They can be malignant (i.e. cancerous) or benign (i.e. noncancerous).  
  • Cancer care team- A team of healthcare professionals that helps in providing care, finding the right treatments, and aid to cancer patients. 
  • Cancer cells- The cells grow and multiply uncontrollably and likely spread throughout the body if not treated properly
  • Cancer cluster- A cancer cluster can be defined as a greater-than-expected number of cases that occurs within a group of people in a geographic area.
  • Cancer imaging- Deals with scans such as CT scans, MRIs, and X-rays to show images of the body.
  • Cancer staging- Doing tests to identify the type of cancer, how big it has formed in the body, and whether it has spread to other body parts.  
  • Cannula- A tin tube inserted into the vein or body cavity to drain off the fluid or either insert a surgical instrument in the body and administer medications.
  • Capsule- It is a very small tube that contains powdered medicines or liquid medicines inside the tube. Examples are cod liver oil capsules.
  • Capillaries: The tiniest blood veins in the body, capillaries carry nutrients and oxygen to tissues.
  • Carcinoembryonic antigen- CEA is a test used to examine how well the therapies are working on certain types of cancer.CEA is also a type of protein found in the body.
  • Carcinogen- An agent or a substance that causes cancer in living tissues.
  • Cardiac- Related to the heart.
  • Cardiac catheterization: During a cardiac catheterization, which is used to assess different heart functions, a long, thin, flexible tube is placed into a blood vessel in the arm, neck, or upper thigh.
  • Cardiac tamponade: Occurs when blood or fluid collects in the sac that surrounds the heart, constricting it and impairing its capacity to pump.
  • Cardioplegia: The temporary stoppage of the heart for the purpose of cardiac surgery.
  • Cardiopulmonary: Having to do with the heart and lungs.
  • Carminative: A herb known as a “carminative” is supposed to relieve gas-related intestinal discomfort.
  • Carotenoids: Substances that give certain plants their red, yellow, and orange colours, like lycopene and beta carotene.
  • Carotid artery: One of the two significant blood vessels on either side of the neck is the carotid artery. The brain receives blood from the carotid arteries.
  • Carotid artery disease: Plaque buildup that causes the carotid artery to narrow. Occasionally referred to as carotid artery stenosis It is a significant ischemic stroke risk factor.
  • Carotid endarterectomy: Surgery to clear the carotid artery of fatty plaque formation and reestablish blood flow to the brain.
  • Carpal tunnel syndrome: A disorder that develops when the median nerve, which travels from the forearm through the hand, is compressed; signs and symptoms include pain, tingling, and numbness as well as hand weakness.
  • Cartilage: Cartilage is a tough connective tissue that cushions joints and supports surrounding tissues.
  • Cartilaginous joint: A cartilaginous joint is one in which only very minor movement is permitted because the bones are tightly linked by cartilage.
  • Catagen: The stage of the hair-growth cycle that is in transition.
  • Cataplexy: Cataplexy is a symptom of narcolepsy and is characterized by a sudden paralysis of some or all muscles brought on by laughing, rage, fear, or other powerful emotions.
  • Cataract: A clouding or fogging of the eye’s lens that may cause vision to become blurry or tinted.
  • Cathartic: A substance that has a powerful laxative effect.
  • Carcinoma- A tumor that forms in the epithelial tissue (i.e. your esophagus and your skin)
  • Catheter- an apparatus that has a thin tube made from medical-grade materials that serve a broad range of functions.
  • Cauda equina: At the tip of the spinal cord, a group of nerve roots resembles a horse’s tail.
  • Causalgia: Severe, persistent burning pain frequently brought on by injury to a peripheral nerve.
  • CBC- Complete blood count is to estimate the number of blood in the body example red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
  • CBE- Also known as a Clinical breast exam that a healthcare provider performs to examine lumps on the breast or other changes in the breast.
  • CBT- Cognitive behavior therapy is a therapy that assists patients to help them change their behavior by converting the way they feel or see a different way.
  • Celiac disease: Gluten, a protein included in wheat, rye, and barley, causes damage to the small intestine in people with celiac disease, which is defined by excessive sensitivity to gluten. Having celiac disease might prevent a person from properly absorbing nutrients from meals.
  • Celiac plexus: Treatment for pain relief known as a nerve block occasionally involves injecting drugs into the celiac plexus, a network of nerves in the upper abdomen.
  • Cells- Known as the basic building blocks of all living things and are the smallest functional and structural unit of an organism.
  • Cell culture- It is also known as tissue culture and it is a process where cells are grown under controlled conditions outside their natural environment i.e. in a laboratory.
  • Cell cycle- This is a chain of events when a cell’s growth takes place and divides.
  • Cellulose- A complex carbohydrate or polysaccharide consisting of more than 3000 glucose units.
  • Central nervous system- It consists of the brain and the spinal cord.
  • Central nervous tumor- A tumor that originates from the brain or spinal cord like craniopharyngioma, medulloblastoma, and meningioma.
  • Cerebellum- Located at the back of your head and plays a vital role in the physical movement of your body.
  • Cerebrum- This is the largest part of your brain and it coordinates your movement and helps regulate temperature.
  • Cerebral aneurysm: A weakening and inflating of a cerebral artery’s inner wall is known as a cerebral aneurysm.
  • Cerebral angiography: An invasive imaging procedure that involves injecting dye into the carotid arteries to highlight the blood vessels on x-rays in order to get detailed images of the brain’s blood vessels.
  • Cerebral cortex: The area of the brain responsible for thought, language, and memory, among other conscious experiences.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Hemorrhagic stroke is sometimes referred to as cerebral hemorrhage, which is bleeding brought on by a blood artery rupture in the brain.
  • Cerebral infarction: A type of stroke brought on by a blood clot blocking a blood vessel that delivers blood to the brain.
  • Cerebrovascular: Concerning the brain’s blood vessels.
  • Cerebrovascular accident: A stroke is referred to in medicine as a cerebrovascular event.
  • Cervical cancer- It is a cancerous tumor that starts in the cervix i.e. the lowermost part of the uterus.
  • Cervicectomy- Surgical procedure that is used to remove the uterine cervix.
  • Cerumen: A fluid that lubricates the skin in the ear and aids in keeping debris out of the ear. usually referred to as earwax.
  • Cervical radiculopathy: A pinched nerve that causes stinging, numbness, and tingling in the areas it supplies.
  • Cervical spine: The cervical spine is made up of the top seven vertebrae and is the portion of the spine that is positioned in the neck.
  • Cervical spondyloarthropathy: A form of inflammatory arthritis that affects the neck region of the spine.
  • ChemotherapyA cancer treatment that uses one or more anti-cancer drugs to kill fast-growing cells in the body.
  • Chronic- Chronic can be said to illness or disease that is for a long time or is constantly recurring.
  • Chromic pain- Persistent pain or a primary symptom that lasts a week or lasts for a long time.
  • Clinical staging- Clinical staging is a method that is used to find out the stage of cancer by doing several tests before surgery.  
  • Clinical trials- This is a type of clinical study where participants are assigned to receive one or more treatments so that researchers can evaluate the effect of the drug on human health. 
  • Colectomy- It is a surgical procedure to help remove all or a part of your colon.
  • Colon- Colon is the longest part of the large intestine in our digestive system. 
  • Colonoscopy- This is an exam that is used to study the changes in the body such as irritated tissue, cancer, polyps, etc.
  • Computed tomography (CT)- A diagnostic imaging procedure that uses X-ray and other computer technology to produce images of the internal body system.
  • Complementary therapy- A therapy that you can use alongside your medical treatment. 
  • Cryoablation- An instrument used to freeze and help destroy abnormal tissue.

                            D

  • Dabrafenib mesylate- Dabrafenib mesylate inhibits some of the proteins produced by the mutant BRAF gene, which may aid in preventing the growth of cancer cells. This kind of kinase inhibitor exists. also known as Tafinlar.
  • Dabska tumor- An uncommon, slowly expanding blood artery tumor that can develop in, on, or beneath the skin in any place on the body. Dabska tumors can take the form of little or big, firm, elevated, purplish lumps. Typically, they don’t spread to other body parts.
  • Dacarbazine- It is a kind of alkylating agent and is used to treat melanoma that has migrated to other parts of the body as well as Hodgkin lymphoma that did not improve with previous anticancer medications.
  • Dacogen- A kind of antimetabolite used to treat chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and other myelodysplastic disorders in adults. known also as decitabine.
  • D-cycloserine- An antibiotic drug that is used for treating tuberculosis.
  • Daidzein- An isoflavone that is present in soy products. Studies on the potential of soy. isoflavones to prevent cancer are ongoing.
  • DBVE regimen- An acronym for a chemotherapeutic regimen used in conjunction with radiation therapy to treat Hodgkin lymphoma in children. Bleomycin sulfate, vincristine sulfate, etoposide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Adriamycin) are among the medications that are part of it. also known as DBVE, ABVE, and ABVE regimen.
  • DCF- An appellation for a chemotherapy regimen used to treat specific strains of stomach cancer and head and neck cancer. Fluorouracil, cisplatin, and docetaxel are among the medications that are a part of it.
  • DCIS-  A disorder where the lining of a breast duct has cancerous cells. The cancerous cells have not invaded other breast tissues outside of the duct.           
  • DDS- DDS known as Denys-Drash syndrome is a rarely seen disease that gets before the age of 3. It causes kidney failure in children and also has a high risk of getting other types of cancers.
  • Debulking- It is a surgical procedure to remove as much as tumor cells in the body.
  • Decortication- An operative or medical procedure that involves the removal of the surface membrane or layer of an organ.
  • Decitabine- A medication used to treat chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and other myelodysplastic disorders in adults. Decitabine may destroy cancer cells by preventing the production of DNA in cells. It belongs to the antimetabolite class. Also known as Dacogen.
  • Decubitus ulcer- Skin damage brought on by prolonged, continuous pressure to a particular area of the skin. This pressure may reduce blood supply to the injured location, which could cause tissue death and damage.
  • Deep sedation- A state of sedation where a person is deeply asleep, has lost feeling and finds it difficult to wake up. Deep sedation is brought on by particular medications, which are used to reduce anxiety during specific medical or surgical operations.
  • Deep vein thrombosis a blood clot developing in a deep leg or lower pelvic vein. The affected area may exhibit symptoms such as discomfort, edema, warmth, and redness. also known as DVT.
  • Defecation- Undigested food, mucus, germs, and cells from the lining of the intestines are all moved through the colon and out the anus in the process of decomposition in the feces. Also known as a bowel motion.
  • Definitive diagnosis- When a patient gets the result of tests like blood tests or biopsy a final diagnosis is made. This final diagnosis is made after completing all the required tests to see whether the patient has a certain disease present or not.
  • Definitive treatment- Treatment that is designed to cure and remove all the cancer cells from an infected person.
  • Deferoxamine- A substance that eliminates iron from tumors by blocking DNA synthesis and resulting in the demise of malignant cells When treating pediatric neuroblastoma, it is used in combination with other anticancer medications.
  • Degenerative disease- A disorder or a disease that changes or gets worse over time. For Example Alzheimer’s disease or osteoporosis.
  • Dehydration- It can be due to illness or sweating that causes dangerous loss of body fluids.
  • Dementia- A persistent or long-term disorder that is caused by brain disease or injury causing memory disorders, impaired reasoning, or changes in personality.
  • De novo mutation- A phrase used to refer to a change in a gene’s DNA sequence that is observed in a person for the first time and hasn’t been seen in prior generations. 
  • De novo variant- The existence of a de novo variant can explain how a person can have a genetic disorder that did not affect either of their parents.
  • Denileukin diftitox- A medication used to treat individuals with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that has returned or failed to improve with prior treatments. 
  • Dense Breast- A phrase used to refer to breast tissue that is more glandular and fibrous than fatty. Only mammography can show dense breast tissue.
  • Dense connective tissue- A particular kind of tissue that is primarily composed of fibroblasts, which are cells, and the stiff protein fibers collagen. Dense connective tissue holds bones, muscles, and other tissues and organs in place and provides support and protection for them.
  • Denys-Drash syndrome- A rare condition that most commonly results in Wilms tumor, aberrant sexual organ development, and renal failure before the age of three. A type of kidney cancer. Children who have Denys-Drash syndrome are also more likely to get certain other cancers. also known as DDS.
  • Death receptor 4- A protein called TRAIL that attaches to another protein that is found on the surface of some cells may be able to kill some cancer cells. On cancer cells, a rise in the quantity or activity of death receptor 4 may result in the death of more cells.
  • Deleterious mutation- A change in the genetic modification that increases an individual susceptibility or predisposition to certain disorders or diseases.
  • Deleterious mutation- Deleterious mutation happens in the DNA where the DNA undergoes a certain change in its DNA sequences and likely causes a person to have a disease and be at risk to have certain genetic disorders.  
  • Dendritic cell- It is a type of immune cell that is found in the tissues and is critical for the initiation of the immune response.
  • Dermabrasion- A procedure used to smooth the skin and enhance the appearance of deep scars, pits, and wrinkles. A doctor uses burr tiny files, brushes, or sandpaper to remove the top layer of skin after numbing the skin.
  • Diagnosis- To discover the signs and symptoms of a disease by doing several test.
  • Diagnostic Imaging- Test that gives images of our body such as X-rays, CT scans, etc.
  • Dialysis- A procedure or test done for patients that have kidney failures.
  • Diarrhea- Loose or watery stool. 
  • Dietitian- A healthcare professional or medical dietician is an expert that helps patients to understand their particular needs and design meal plans accordingly.
  • Disease- An illness or disorder in a human, animal, or plant that negatively affects the function or structure of all or parts of an organism. 

                        E

  • Ear canal: The passageway connecting the eardrum and the outer ear.
  • EBCT: Electron-beam computed tomography, or EBCT, is a high-speed imaging technique used to assess the heart and quantify calcium buildup in arteries.
  • Eccentric action: When muscles extend in order to move joints also referred to as cerumen.
  • ECG: Electrocardiogram, often known as an ECG, is a test that monitors the electrical activity of the heart and looks for signs of a cardiac condition.
  • Echocardiography: A diagnostic procedure that creates images of the size, composition, and motion of the heart using high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound).
  • Eclampsia: A severe blood pressure disorder that can endanger both the lives of the pregnant mother and the unborn child.
  • Ectopic pregnancy: Pregnancy in which a fertilized egg implants abnormally, typically in the fallopian tubes, outside the uterus. The pregnancy must be ended.
  • Ectropion: When a lower eyelid, typically, turns outward, exposing the inner surface.
  • Eczema: A skin condition that is characterized by flaky, itching, red, and cracked skin patches. Additionally called atopic dermatitis.
  • ED: Erectile dysfunction, often known as the inability to achieve or sustain an erection strong enough for sexual activity, is a term that is frequently used.
  • Edema: Swelling brought on by an unnatural buildup of fluid in tissues.
  • EEG: Electroencephalogram is the abbreviation for the test that assesses the electrical activity of the brain and looks for issues.
  • Effusion: An abnormal accumulation of fluid in a joint or tissue.
  • Eight cranial nerve: A nerve that sends the brain information about balance and sound. Referred to as the auditory nerve.
  • Ejection fraction: The volume of blood that the left ventricle expels with each heartbeat. Ejection fractions often fall between 55% and 70%.
  • EKG: Electrocardiogram, often known as an EKG, is a test that monitors the electrical activity of the heart and looks for signs of a cardiac condition.
  • Elastin: Elastin is a stretchy, elastic protein that is present in connective tissue and skin.
  • Electroencephalogram: An examination that examines the electrical activity of the brain and looks for issues is the electroencephalogram.
  • Electrolysis: A hair-thin needle placed into the base of each hair follicle during electrolysis kills the hair follicle one at a time.
  • Electrolyte: Minerals in the body that have an electrical charge and are crucial to many bodily functions, including controlling fluid balance. Sodium and calcium are two examples.
  • Electromyography: A test that evaluates the condition of the muscles and the nerves that govern them.
  • Electron-beam computed tomography: The heart’s health can be assessed and calcium buildup in arteries can be quantified using electron-beam computed tomography, a high-speed imaging tool. known as EBCT at times.
  • Electrophysiologic testing: The process of electrophysiologic testing is used to induce arrhythmias that are known or suspected.
  • Elimination diets: A method of identifying food allergies in which questionable foods are gradually eliminated from the diet until the culprit is identified.
  • Ellagic acid: A molecule that can be found in some plants, including strawberries and raspberries, and it may help prevent cancer.
  • Embolic stroke: This kind of stroke happens when a blood clot that has developed elsewhere in the body fragments and travels through the bloodstream until it stops an artery that usually transports blood to the brain.
  • Embolism: When a blood clot (an embolus) travels from one area of the body to another, it blocks a blood vessel.
  • Embolus: A blood clot or particle that originates in one area of the body and travels through the circulation before settling in a blood artery and obstructing blood flow in another area of the body.
  • Emesis: The act of vomiting caused by a medicine or other agent.
  • EMG: The term “EMG” stands for electromyography, a test that evaluates the condition of the muscles and the nerves that regulate them.
  • Emission: The release or discharge of a material, typically a fluid.
  • Emmenagogue: Herbs that promote menstrual blood flow are known as emmenagogues.
  • Enamel: The dense outer layer of a tooth.
  • Encephalitis: A serious and occasionally fatal brain inflammation that can be brought on by a variety of different viruses.

                F

  • Facet joints: These are paired joints that connect one vertebra to its neighbors. They enable the spine to move independently.
  • Facet rhizotomy: A surgical procedure to reduce pain by destroying specific nerves and nerve roots.
  • Familial combined hyperlipidemia: In familial mixed hyperlipidemia, the liver overproduces very low-density lipoprotein, leading to elevated levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, or both.
  • Familial hypercholesterolemia: An inherited condition in which the liver is unable to effectively eliminate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles from the blood, leading to an extremely high cholesterol level.
  • Fasting plasma glucose test: A blood test known as a fasting plasma glucose test measures the blood’s sugar (glucose) content following an overnight fast of at least eight hours.
  • Fast-twitch fiber: One of the two primary subtypes of skeletal muscle fiber is fast-twitch fiber. When short bursts of power are required, as in sprinting, fast-twitch fibers are most frequently recruited. See also fiber with slow twitch.
  • Fat: One of the three essential nutrients, along with proteins and carbs.
  • Fatigue: a deficiency in energy. a gradual decline in one’s capacity for performing a physical or mental task
  • Fatty acids: Elements of fats that cells can utilize as a source of energy.
  • Fatty streak: A buildup of fatty materials in the blood vessel wall, which is the first stage of atherosclerosis.
  • Febrile: Having a high body temperature; feverish.
  • Faecal impaction: A mass of dry, hard feces lodges in the rectum are known as faecal impaction.
  • Fecal occult blood test: A test that looks for blood in the stool to look for colorectal cancer.
  • Femur: The hip bone is the femur.
  • Ferritin: A protein called ferritin that binds to and stores iron.
  • Fiber: A component of plant foods that the body is unable to digest.
  • Fibrillation: Rapid, erratic contractions of the heart’s muscle. The heart is unable to pump blood or contract normally when this happens.
  • Fibrin: Fibrin is the main substance that causes a blood clot. It is a stringy protein.
  • Fibrinogen: It is a protein that promotes the formation of blood clots, which helps to halt bleeding.
  • Fibroadenoma: A non-cancerous tumor called a fibroadenoma is typically found in the breast.
  • Fibroblast: A cell that aids in the development of connective tissue’s collagen and elastic fibers.
  • Fibroid: A growth in the uterus that is not cancerous.
  • Fibromyalgia: A disorder known as fibromyalgia causes discomfort and painful areas all over the body.
  • Fibrous plaque: An accumulation of fat inside a blood artery that obstructs blood flow.
  • Filtering procedure: Technique for filtering a glaucoma treatment in which a surgeon makes a drainage hole in the eye to release pressure.
  • Finasteride: A drug called finasteride is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia.
  • Fixed joint: An immobile or fixed joint is the point at which two bones unite.
  • Floaters: Tiny spots or lines that develop in someone’s field of vision as their eye’s jelly-like fluid ages. Although they are typically benign, they can indicate serious eye issues.
  • Fluorescein angiography: A test that looks at retinal blood flow using a camera and a specific dye.
  • Fluoride: It is a mineral that shields teeth from cavities and tooth decay.
  • Fluoroscopy: A procedure that produces moving images of the interior of the body; akin to an x-ray film.
  • Focal neuropathy: Damage to a particular nerve resulting in numbness or discomfort.
  • Follicle: A cluster of cells that resembles a little sac.
  • Follicle-stimulating hormone: A hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that encourages the creation of sperm and eggs in males and females, respectively.
  • Follicular unit: A little bundle of one to four follicles, oil glands, a tiny muscle, and other tissue.
  • Follicular unit transplantation: The transplanting of follicular units, which resemble the growth of hair in a natural way.
  • Folliculitis: Hair follicle irritation.
  • Fovea: A tiny depression in the retina’s center known as the fovea is responsible for acute central vision.
  • Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A brain disorder that can lead to dementia, aphasia, neurotic behavior, and gradual alterations in personality and emotional control.
  • Frozen shoulder: An inflammation of the shoulder’s different tissues and the development of aberrant tissue bands that make the shoulder stiff and severely restrict its range of motion.
  • FSH: An acronym for follicle-stimulating hormone, which is a hormone secreted by the pituitary gland that increases the production of eggs and sperm in both men and women.
  • Functional gastrointestinal disorders: Gut issues unrelated to an infection or gastrointestinal system structural issues.
  • Functional incontinence: The inability to urinate while being aware of the need to do so owing to mental or physical issues, such as poor mobility
  • Fundoplication: An operation to reorganize the stomach to stop the acid reflux.
  • Fundus photography: An imaging procedure that produces three-dimensional images of the retina.
  • Fungus: Organisms and microbes that can live as parasites on plants and animals, including yeasts and molds.
  • Footling breech:  When one or more of a breech baby’s feet are located underneath its belly.
  • Forceps delivery: To assist with the delivery of the child, smooth metal tools like big spoons or tongs are employed.
  • Fourth-degree tear: A rip that affects both the rectum and anal canal after childbirth.

              G

  • Gain: The amount of sound that a hearing aid can amplify, expressed in decibels.
  • Gait cycle: When walking, the feet and legs move in a cycle that starts when one heel strikes the ground and ends when that same heel strikes the ground once more.
  • Galactagogue: An agent that encourages the production of breast milk.
  • Gamma-aminobutyric acid: It is a brain chemical messenger that may aid in promoting slow-wave sleep and reducing anxiety. frequently known as GABA.
  • Ganglion: A ganglion is an aberrant yet unharmful mass of tissue that typically contains nerve cells.
  • Ganglion cyst: A ganglion cyst is a painless sac of fluid that typically develops on the wrist or back of the hand, above a joint or tendon.
  • Gangrene: It is the term for tissue death in a region of the body where blood flow has been interrupted.
  • Gastric: Concerning the stomach.
  • Gastritis: Stomach lining inflammation.
  • Gastroesophageal reflux disease: An ailment whereby food and stomach acid flow back into the esophagus, resulting in heartburn.
  • Gastrointestinal: Concerning all or some of the digestive system’s organs, which extend from the mouth to the anus.
  • Gene: Chromosome structures that are passed from one parent to the next. the fundamental piece of matter that parents pass on to their children.
  • Gene therapy: The replacement of a defective gene with a normal gene to treat a genetic abnormality.
  • Generic medication: A replica of a name-brand medication whose patent has expired. These medications cost less than those with brand names.
  • Genetic: referring to genes or hereditary traits.
  • Genistein: An antioxidant substance present in some plants, including soybeans.
  • GERD: It stands for gastroesophageal reflux disease, a disorder in which food and stomach acid flow back into the esophagus, resulting in discomfort.
  • Gestational diabetes mellitus: A kind of diabetes that manifests during pregnancy.
  • GFR: Glomerular filtration rate, or GFR, is the term used to describe the speed at which the kidneys filter extra water and other pollutants. The same-named test is performed to assess how well the kidneys are working.
  • Giant cell arteritis: Vascular inflammation and injury in the head and neck caused by giant cell arteritis.
  • Gingiva: Another word for gums, a type of oral tissue that encircles the bone around a tooth’s root.
  • Gingivitis: An infection of the gums.
  • Gland: Any organ or tissue that secretes liquids, such as hormones, for use in other parts of the body or as waste.
  • Glans penis: The penile head.
  • Glaucoma: A condition in which an eye’s internal pressure is excessively high and harms the eye.
  • Gleason score: The Gleason score in men with prostate cancer offers an approximate estimation of how quickly the cancer is progressing.
  • Glenohumeral joint: The shoulder joint known as the glenohumeral joint joins the glenoid and humerus ball.
  • Glenoid: The scapula’s socket at the shoulder where it joins the humerus.
  • Glomerular filtration rate: How quickly the kidneys remove extra water and other waste. The same-named test is performed to assess how well the kidneys are working.
  • Glomeruli: Filtering waste from the blood is the kidneys’ glomeruli, which are little collections of capillaries.
  • Glucagon: A pancreatic hormone that causes blood sugar levels to rise.
  • Glucocorticoids: The adrenal gland releases these steroid hormones when a threat appears, inducing the stress reaction.
  • Glucose: A simple sugar that provides the majority of the body’s energy needs.
  • Glucose intolerance: It is the term for blood sugar levels that are elevated but not yet diabetes-related.
  • Glutamate: It is a brain chemical messenger that may be involved in schizophrenia and mood disorders.
  • Glutamic acid decarboxylase: It is a protein that is present in beta cells, which are the cells that produce insulin.
  • Glycemic index: A classification of foods based on how rapidly and significantly they raise blood sugar.
  • Glycemic load: A classification of the amount that a typical serving of a certain food can raise blood sugar.
  • Glycogen: The body’s fuel stores are called glycogen. This molecule, which is mostly stored in the muscles and liver, is later changed into glucose to supply energy to cells.
  • Glycosylated hemoglobin: Hemoglobin that has been attached to glucose (blood sugar) is known as glycosylated hemoglobin (the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells). usually abbreviated to HbA1c, or haemoglobin A1c.
  • GnRH: Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, or GnRH, is the hormone that causes the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
  • GnRH antagonists: Substances that prevent the production of luteinizing hormone and do not result in a brief increase in testosterone and are used to treat prostate cancer.
  • Goblet cells: Mucus-producing cells that line the lungs and digestive system.
  • Goiter: A neck lump caused by an enlarged thyroid gland.
  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone: A hormone that causes the pituitary gland to release follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone.
  • Gonioscopy: A glaucoma test that looks at the area where fluid drains from the eye.
  • Gout: The big toe, knee, and ankle joints can develop gout, a form of arthritis when uric acid builds up in the joints.
  • Graft definition: The transfer of tissue from one area of the body to another.
  • Graves’ disease: An autoimmune condition that results in excessive thyroid hormone production by the thyroid gland. In addition to occasionally having double vision and vision loss, it is typically accompanied by an enlarged thyroid gland and swollen, bulging, red eyes that seem to stare.
  • Greenstick fracture: A fracture in a young, soft bone where the bone bends and fractures only on the outside of the bend.
  • Growth factor: A chemical the body produces to promote tissue growth.
  • the esophagus, or gullet.
  • Gum disease: Conditions include gingivitis and periodontitis that affect the tooth-supporting structures and gum tissue. likewise known as periodontal disease.
  • Gums: Oral tissue that encircles and protects the bone around tooth roots. also known as the gingiva.

          H

  • Hair bulb: The base of the hair shaft.
  • Hair cells: Ear cells that play a key part in hearing by sending sound signals to the brain.
  • Hair shaft: The part of the hair that protrudes from the skin’s surface. The brain, medulla, and cuticle are its three layers (not always present).
  • Hallucination: The perception of an unreal object.
  • Hammertoe: A sometimes painful ailment in which the toe curls up and under (resembling a hammer)
  • Harm reduction therapy: It is a type of therapy that works to lessen the negative effects of an addiction trigger. Through this tactical approach, individuals can learn how to reduce the hazards connected with their use of their addictive substance without necessarily stopping.
  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: An illness where the immune system of the body stops the thyroid gland from making adequate thyroid hormone.
  • Hay fever: Asthmatic rhinitis, often known as hay fever, is a seasonal or year-round allergy illness characterized by a runny nose, sneezing, and congestion. It is the most prevalent kind of allergy and is brought on by an IgE-mediated immunological reaction to airborne allergens ingested.
  • Hemoglobin A1c: often known as HbA1c, is the result of the binding of glucose (blood sugar) to hemoglobin (a protein in red blood cells). HbA1c testing is a helpful indicator of blood sugar control.
  • High-density lipoprotein, or HDL: It is the abbreviation for this so-called “good” cholesterol. It is thought that this lipoprotein, which is a mixture of protein and fat, removes cholesterol from the arteries.
  • Hearing aid: A loudening electronic gadget is worn in or behind the ear by someone with hearing loss.
  • Heart attack: The word “heart attack” refers to myocardial infarction. When blood flow to a portion of the heart is obstructed or severely constrained, harm results. Typically, an atherosclerotic plaque rupture causes occlusion.
  • Heart block: The inability or difficulty of the electrical signal that causes the atrioventricular node to contract.
  • Heart failure: When the heart is unable to pump enough blood to meet the requirements of the body’s organs.
  • Heart murmur: An additional or unexpected sound that is audible during the heartbeat. A murmur could indicate a cardiac condition or it might not.
  • Heart rate: The average heartbeat per minute is between 60 and 100 beats.
  • Heartburn: A burning ache in the chest or throat brought on by esophageal reflux of stomach acid.
  • Heberden’s nodes: Bony lumps seen on certain persons with osteoarthritis’ finger joints.
  • Hedonistic: Dedicated to enjoyment.
  • Hedonic treadmill: The propensity for people to adjust to new situations and eventually accept them as normal, causing the emotional effects—whether positive or negative—produced by a shift to diminish with time.
  • Heel spur: An unnatural bone or calcium growth on the heel bone.
  • Helicobacter pylori: Bacteria that harms the stomach’s lining. Most stomach irritation and ulcers are caused by it. commonly known as H. pylori.
  • Helper T cells: Immune system cells that activate and instruct other immune system cells in the fight against illness.
  • Hematemesis: Bright red blood in the vomit that indicates upper digestive tract bleeding.
  • Hematoma: Blood that accumulates in the body after leaking out of blood vessels.
  • Hematuria: Urine that contains blood
  • Hemianopsia: One or both eyes, with poor vision or blindness in the lower half of the visual field.
  • Hemiparesis: A weakening of the muscles on one side of the body.
  • Hemiplegia: Body paralysis on one side.
  • Hemochromatosis: A hereditary disorder in which the body absorbs and stores an excessive amount of iron.
  • Hemodialysis: When the kidneys are not functioning correctly, wastes and pollutants are removed from the blood using a machine.
  • Hemoglobin: The chemical that carries oxygen and gives red blood cells their colour.
  • Hemoptysis: Blood coming up via the nose or mouth from the lungs.
  • Hemorrhage: Bleeding caused by a broken blood artery.
  • Hemorrhagic stroke: This type of stroke happens when a blood vessel leaks or bursts inside the brain, preventing that area of the brain from receiving oxygen and nutrients.
  • HEPA: High-efficiency particulate air filter, or HEPA filter, is a type of extremely effective air filter.
  • Heparin: A medication that stops blood clots.
  • Herd immunity: The phenomenon of preventing the spread of an infectious illness when a large enough population is immune to it.
  • Herniated disc: When a spinal disk’s hard outer shell tears or develops a weak area, allowing a portion of the disc to protrude. often referred to as a prolapsed disc
  • Herpes zoster: Also known as shingles, is an uncomfortable skin rash with blisters brought on by the chicken pox virus.
  • Hiatal hernia: When a portion of the stomach pushes through an unusual gap in the diaphragm and into the chest.
  • High blood pressure: Occurs when the blood flowing through the arteries pushes against the artery walls for an extended length of time with an unusually high force. Likewise known as hypertension.
  • High-density lipoprotein: Or “good cholesterol.” This lipoprotein, a mixture of fat and protein, cleans the arteries of cholesterol.
  • High-intensity focused ultrasound: A procedure that uses heat produced by ultrasound energy to vaporize malignancies.
  • Hippocampus: A crucial brain region for processing long-term memories.
  • Hirsutism: Excessive body or facial hair in females.
  • Histamine: A chemical that the immune system releases when it encounters an allergen. Many allergy symptoms are brought on by histamines.
  • HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, is the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune cells are damaged by HIV, making them incapable of warding off additional diseases.
  • Hives: An irritating, typically transient rash. also referred to as urticaria
  • HLA: Stands for human leukocyte antigen, a protein that is present on the outer layer of white blood cells and aids the body in identifying and fending off foreign invaders.
  • Holter monitor: A little device worn for a day or longer to record the electrical activity of the heart. Holter monitors are used to assisting identify issues with cardiac rhythm.
  • Homeostasis: The body’s capacity to maintain the proper levels of water, oxygen, blood pressure, temperature, and other factors so that cells can survive.
  • Homocysteine: During the typical breakdown of protein, the amino acid homocysteine is produced.
  • Homocystinuria: It is a rare hereditary condition that results in very high homocysteine levels in the blood.
  • Hormone therapy: Using drugs to increase hormone levels that fall off with age.
  • Hormones: They are potent substances that have a significant impact on a variety of bodily functions, such as growth, mood, and sexual function.
  • Host: A host is any living thing that can become infected by a virus or other pathogen in the presence of other living things.
  • Hot flash: An acute, abrupt feeling of heat in the face or upper torso accompanied by a quick heartbeat, perspiration, and flushing. a menopausal symptom.
  • Humectant: A component of moisturizers that attracts water to the skin and holds it there to hydrate it.
  • HPA: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, sometimes known as the HPA, is a hormonal regulatory system that regulates a variety of bodily functions, including the stress response.
  • HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus: Is the virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Immune cells are damaged by HIV, making them incapable of warding off additional diseases.
  • Human leukocyte antigen: A protein on white blood cells’ surfaces that aids the body in identifying and fending off foreign invaders.
  • Humoral immunity: Protection against infection and sickness brought on by the blood’s release of antibodies.
  • Huntington’s disease: An inherited condition marked by dementia and jerky, uncontrollable movements.
  • Hyaluronic acid: It is a moisturizing substance that cells release.
  • Hydrogen breath test: A procedure for determining the presence of hydrogen in the breath, which increases when food isn’t being effectively absorbed.
  • Hydrogenation: Adding hydrogen to a chemical. Vegetable oils that are liquid are solidified by hydrogenation. Trans fats, which are produced as a result of the procedure, are bad for the heart and blood vessels.
  • Hydroxyapatite: A dense material that makes up a significant portion of bones and teeth.
  • Hygiene hypothesis: The belief that modern sanitation prevents young children from being exposed to as many germs, which increases allergies.
  • Hyperaldosteronism: Excessive levels of the hormone aldosterone cause the kidneys to retain water and sodium, which frequently results in high blood pressure.
  • Hyperalgesia: An elevated pain threshold.
  • Hypercholesterolemia: Elevated blood cholesterol levels.
  • Hyperglycemia: An excessively high blood sugar level.
  • Hyperinsulinemia: An elevated level of insulin in the blood.
  • Hyperlipidemia: Elevated blood lipid levels (fats and waxes such as cholesterol).
  • Hyperopia: Difficulty recognizing nearer objects.

      I

  • Iatrogenic: Problems or negative outcomes brought on by medical care.
  • IBD: Inflammatory bowel disease is the umbrella name encompassing ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, two conditions that cause the intestines to swell and become inflamed.
  • ICD: It stands for implantable cardioverter defibrillator, a device that sends a shock to the heart to interrupt a potentially fatal rhythm and bring it back to a normal (sinus) rhythm.
  • Ice pick headaches: They are stabbing, extremely severe, and fleeting headaches that occur suddenly.
  • Idiopathic: An illness or condition with no known cause.
  • IgE: Immunoglobulin E, also known as IgE, is the protein that causes the majority of allergic reactions
  • Ileum: The ileum is the small intestine’s last segment.
  • Iliopsoas muscles: Two muscles that elevate the knee. They run from the end of the spine to the thighbone.
  • Immediate hypersensitivity: A type of allergy reaction involving IgE and brought on by certain allergens. These are the most common allergic reactions to food, dust, mold, pollen, pets, dust, and insect venom.
  • Immobilize: To prevent a limb or other body part from moving in order to promote recovery.
  • Immunity: The body’s capacity to fend off illness and infection.
  • Immunization: The body is stimulated to develop antibodies by injection of safe germs or viruses, preparing it to fight off a specific disease.
  • Immunoglobulin: Immune system-produced proteins known as immunoglobulins target foreign substances. also referred to as antibodies.
  • Immunoglobulin E: The substance that causes the majority of allergic reactions is immunoglobulin E.
  • Immunologically privileged site: a region of the body known as an immunologically privileged site, such as the eye or the ovaries, where the immune system is unable to work since doing so could cause tissue harm.
  • Immunosuppressive medication: Medicine that suppresses the immune system; frequently prescribed following organ transplantation to prevent rejection of the new organ.
  • Immunotherapy: The enhancement or suppression of the immune system to treat disease.
  • Impacted: A tooth that is firmly set in place, like a wisdom tooth.
  • Impaction: A mass of solidified feces obstructing the colon or rectum.
  • Impaired fasting glucose: Elevated blood sugar levels without yet developing diabetes. This phrase is used when a fasting plasma glucose test reveals high blood sugar levels.
  • Impaired glucose tolerance: elevated blood sugar levels without yet developing diabetes. This phrase is used when an oral glucose tolerance test reveals elevated blood sugar levels.
  • Impedance hearing testing: A test to see if a condition in the middle ear is the source of hearing loss by sending sound waves to the eardrum.
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillator: A device inserted into the chest and attached to the heart that administers a shock to interrupt a potentially fatal rhythm and restore a normal (sinus) rhythm.
  • Impotence: The inability of the penis to become or maintain the necessary level of firmness for sexual activity.
  • in situ: Latin meaning in position is in situ.
  • Inactivated vaccines: vaccinations that include germs that have been killed so they can no longer spread disease are known as inactivated vaccines.
  • Incision: An incision is a surgically caused wound to the skin or an organ.
  • Incontinence: Uncontrollable passage of excrement or urine.
  • Incubation period: The interval between exposure to an infection and the onset of symptoms is known as the incubation period.
  • Infarct: An infarct is a region of dead tissue brought on by a lack of blood flow.
  • Infarction: The lack of blood-related death of tissue.
  • Infection: The development of pathogenic organisms, such as bacteria, in the body.
  • Infectious arthritis: Arthritis brought on by pathogens like bacteria.
  • Inferior myocardial infarction: An inferior myocardial infarction is a heart attack that affects the heart’s posterior wall.
  • Inferior vena cava: The big vein that conducts blood from the lower body to the heart is called the inferior vena cava.
  • Infiltrating cancer: A malignancy that has infiltrated the tissue around it after spreading from its original site.
  • Inflammation: The body’s response to an injury or infection is inflammation. It is characterized by discomfort, heat, redness, swelling, and inflammation.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: A catch-all phrase for ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, two conditions that result in enlarged, inflamed intestines. frequently known as IBD.
  • Infusion: The gradual injection of a liquid into tissues or a vein.
  • Ingrown toenails: An ingrown toenail is a disorder where the side of the toenail pierces the skin, resulting in discomfort, edema, and occasionally infection.
  • Inhibitory neurochemical: An inhibitory neurochemical is one that halts the flow of information between nerve cells.
  • Injectable fillers: Fillers that can be injected beneath the skin to smooth wrinkles or accentuate lips.
  • Injection: Insert liquids into the body using a hollow needle and syringe, such as pharmaceuticals.
  • Innate immunity: The body’s fundamental protection against illness or infection, present since birth.
  • Inner ear: The cochlea and labyrinth are found in the inner ear, which is the section of the ear that is the deepest.
  • Inoperable: A condition that cannot be operated on is said to be inoperable.
  • Insomnia: The inability to fall asleep or wake up feeling rested.
  • Insulin: The amount of glucose (sugar) in the blood is regulated by the hormone insulin, which is produced by the pancreas.
  • Insulin resistance: A condition known as insulin resistance occurs when the body produces insulin but is unable to adequately utiliz

 

 

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Medsurge India is one of the pioneers and the most reputable company in the field of medical tourism in India. India offers World Class Medical Facilities, comparable with any of the Western and European countries. India has state of the art Hospitals and the finest medical experts. With the most excellent infrastructure, the best possible Medical facilities, accompanied with the most competitive prices, you can get the treatment done in India at the lowest charges. The Availability of Ayurveda and Naturopathy in the purest form makes India the most sought after health destination.

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